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7/28/15 Hero #4 Incredible Bats

Hero #4 of our "Every Hero Has a Story" summer reading program was Sharon Peterson.  Sharon is an elementary school teacher and has been trained by Bat Conservation International in the conservation of bats.  She brought along several live Egyptian Fruit Bats and an African Straw-Colored Fruit Bat.  Her "Incredible Bats" program featured a slide presentation and then she brought out the live bats.  The slide presentation was very informative but seeing the bats live and in person was the real show stopper.  Children were allowed to pet a bat while Sharon held it and walked around the room to each person who wanted a turn.  Surprisingly most of the adults in the room passed!  Sharon also held the bat up in the air so the it could spread its wings and it was amazing to see an animal with a body that is only about 5 inches big have a wing span of a foot and a half.  Sharon shared some fun facts with the kids like bats are NOT blind.  And, if your parents have ever told you bats will get stuck in your hair this is a myth.  If a bat has ever flown close to your head it is probably because a mosquito was hovering there and the bat wanted a tasty meal.  55 people attended "Incredible Bats" and the library would like to thank the Edna Pugh Trust Fund for sponsoring the program.  Starting in August story hour will go back to its normal time of 4:30 on Thursday afternoons.  All ages are welcome!

7/17/15 Every Hero Has a Story

    Hero #3, of our "Every Hero Has a Story" summer reading program was Becky Knight.  Becky is an entomologist or bug scientist.  She read Leo the Lightning Bug by author Eric Drachman.  Mr. Drachman said, "I was inspired to write "Leo the Lightning Bug" one summer while watching a tremendous thunder storm from a screened in porch in the woods. The lightning was striking all around the cottage when I saw a little lightning bug fly by the screen lighting up his own light! I thought to myself, "I wonder if he thinks he's doing all of this?!?" ...and Leo was born. His struggle (with his small size and lack of self-confidence) is not unique to fireflies in the woods - all kids (and most adults) can relate to Leo's adventure."  Becky talked about lightening bugs to the children, explaining that they are part of the beetle family. She asked them if they knew how many different species of beetles there were?  The answer....about 400,000.  Did you also know that fireflies lights may be  yellow, green, or pale red?  Interesting facts for the children to learn.  The story hour finished with a hunt around the library to find 10 different objects that a scientist might study, and making their own trail mix. 

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